Curating Digital Pedagogy #mla17 #s155

January 5, 2017 § Leave a comment

mla2017logogAdd your definition of “digital pedagogy” to this google form, https://goo.gl/forms/siBf9036aPBufXE73, then please join me, two of my co-editors, and two curators for a panel at the MLA Annual Convention tonight.

Thursday, 5 January 155. Curating Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities 7:00–8:15 p.m., Franklin 3, Philadelphia Marriott A special session

Presiding: Katherine D. Harris, San José State Univ.

Speakers: Lauren Coats, Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge; Anne Cong-Huyen, Whittier Coll.; Rebecca Davis, St. Edward’s Univ.; Matthew K. Gold, Graduate Center, City Univ. of New York; Elizabeth Mathews Losh, Coll. of William and Mary

Respondent: Zach Whalen, Univ. of Mary Washington

This session addresses the shifting definitions of digital pedagogy by focusing on some of the important practices that help define it. Each participant presents sample teaching materials related to a particular aspect of digital pedagogy before discussing how open digital publishing has revolutionized pedagogy through broad sharing, reusing, and hacking of digital assignments.

keywords: digital pedagogy, digital humanities, pedagogy

Full abstracts are available at our github site: https://github.com/curateteaching/digitalpedagogy/blob/master/MLA2017.md

And my slides are here:

Liberal Education: A New Game for Your Smartphone–My Latest from AAC&U’s LEAP Blog

January 4, 2017 § Leave a comment

Originally posted October 19, 2016 on AAC&U’s LEAP Blog, http://aacu.org/leap/liberal-education-nation-blog/liberal-education-new-game-your-smartphone

Faculty members face a conundrum—how can they engage students who are absorbed in their smartphones? According to our most recent Freshman Technology Survey at St. Edward’s University, 99 percent of incoming freshmen will be bringing a smartphone to campus, and according to the Pew Research Center, 72 percent of  American adults report owning a smartphone. So, what are our students doing on these ubiquitous devices? Texting friends, checking in on social media, and, since July, playing Pokémon Go, which this summer peaked around 25 million daily active users according to GameSpot. Even if you haven’t played it, I suspect students on your campus are. The game tracks physical activity like walking and turns it into movement through the game. Players earn points by finding and capturing Pokémon, pick up needed supplies at PokéStops, which are virtual locations mapped onto physical geography, and automatically track achievements in their Pokédex. The game’s huge popularity stems from the existing Pokémon culture, which emerged in the mid-1990s, meaning that many of today’s college students can’t remember a time when there weren’t Pokémon. « Read the rest of this entry »

Critical Digital Pedagogy at the University of North Texas

October 14, 2016 § Leave a comment

Yesterday and today I’ve been at the University of North Texas as part of their Critical Digital Pedagogy faculty mentoring community.  Last night, I gave a talk I’ve delivered multiple times, “Designing for Agency  in the Emerging Digital Ecosystem”. I include a link to the slides and works cited below.  This morning I am teaching a workshop on Digital Liberal Arts with the goal that participants will construct their own assignment.  These events are important precursors the the institution wide-engagement needed to transform the curriculum and intentionally multiple high-impact assignments that gives students repeated practice partnering with technology to solve unstructured problems (complex problems to which there is not a clear answer). « Read the rest of this entry »

Designing for Agency with the Digital Liberal Arts

September 29, 2016 § Leave a comment

Today, I’m speaking at the College of Idaho as part of their Mellon-funded Digital Liberal Arts  Initiative.  Slides are available below, with references below that.

Slides

References

The Digital and the Liberal Arts

Pokémon Go

Participatory Culture

Designing Digitally-Informed Liberal Education

Signature Work: Collaborative Digital Scholarship Projects

Scaffolding the Digital Curriculum

Social Annotation

Computer-Assisted Text Analysis

FitBits and Analyzing Personal Data

  • Mike Wasserman, Assistant Professor, Environmental Science & Policy, “Incorporating Personal Health Devices Into Environmental Science and Global Studies Courses in Angers, France: Understanding the Influence of Culture and Environment on Human Health” http://think.stedwards.edu/tltr/2015-tltr-pilot-projects

Wikistorming

Storymapping

Engaging Faculty

Models

Reconciling Online Learning and the Liberal Arts College

August 8, 2016 § Leave a comment

IMG_4508

Pokémon Go View from Westin Alexandria

Today, I’m speaking to teams at a workshop to launch  round two of the Consortium for Online Humanities Instruction, a project of the Council of Independent Colleges (CIC).  For some thoughts on round one, see these blog posts by Gretchen McKay (http://gretchenkreahlingmckay.net/uncategorized/thoughts-at-the-end-of-cic-online-humanities-consortium-i/) and Kevin Gannon (http://www.thetattooedprof.com/archives/640).

Here’s a description:

Reconciling Online Learning and the Liberal Arts College

The future of liberal education depends upon an integrative vision of digitally-informed learning that is not merely content delivery online but rather is reshaped in the same ways that digital learning has already fundamentally changed our culture. This session will present a vision for the digital transformation of liberal education through a curriculum that scaffolds self-directed, digitally-augmented problem-solving and the institutional strategies to support it.

Slides are available via slide share and references are below:

Slides

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Defining Digital Pedagogy

January 9, 2016 § Leave a comment

What is digital pedagogy?

wikipedia.digital.pedagogy.smIf you don’t have a definition, you might think of checking Wikipedia, but I’m afraid that won’t work for you. Given this absence, we’re asking our network to help us with the definition by entering it on a google form here, tinyurl.com/whatisdigped, or tweeting it to the hashtag #curateteaching.

I’ve been working on the answer to this question for the past few years in collaboration with Matthew K. Gold, Katherine D. Harris, and Jentery Sayers. Our project, Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities: Concepts, Models, and Experiments is currently under development with MLA Books, available in github at https://github.com/curateteaching/digitalpedagogy, and has one set of keywords undergoing open peer review in the MLA Commons at https://digitalpedagogy.commons.mla.org/: failure, multimodal, poetry, professionalization, project management, race, sexuality, and text analysis. « Read the rest of this entry »

Building Liberal Arts Capacities through Digital Social Learning

September 18, 2015 § Leave a comment

Today, I’m speaking at Smith College about how we can build liberal arts capacities in our emerging digital ecosystem, which is shaped by networks and driven by data.  This ecosystem requires the same liberal arts capacities, but we need to develop and practice them in new contexts.  I provide the slides from my talk below, as well as a list of references for the model assignments I am sharing.  In addition, the reference section contains pointers to more examples and sources for pedagogical advice the method in question. « Read the rest of this entry »

Engaged Learning in Digital Culture, Susquehanna University

August 26, 2015 § Leave a comment

This morning, I am speaking at Susquehanna University as part of their workshop on “Digital Tools for Liberal Arts Pedagogy”.

Engaged Learning in Digital Culture

How do we engage learners in the context of our globally-networked, data-driven, participatory digital culture?  Not by moving the lecture hall online.  Instead, we must create a curriculum that builds our students’ abilities to apply their learning to complex problems in the context of that culture.  Students must practice analyzing, transferring, and integrating their learning using digital data, tools, and approaches to solve unscripted problems. This talk will present a vision for a liberal arts curriculum that scaffolds self-directed, digitally-augmented problem-solving from introductory to capstone level courses.

Slides are here:
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New Faculty Roles in the Emerging Digital Ecosystem (discussion results & resources)

July 27, 2015 § Leave a comment

Discussion Results: Old Faculty Roles

Discussion Results: Old Faculty Roles

On July 16 I led an interactive discussion session on “New Faculty Roles in the Emerging Digital Ecosystem” at the AAC&U Institute for Integrative Learning and the Departments. This post contains the slides I used, discussions results, and some brief bibliography.

Session Description

If all information is available online and the best professors are giving their lectures away for free, do we really need so many faculty members?  This questioning provides an important opportunity to redefine the faculty role in a way that advances the goals of liberal education.  Rather than merely being repositories of content knowledge, faculty must help students progress along the path to mastering life-long learning. Terminal degrees indicate not only content expertise, but also the transferable learning skills of a master-learner, including synthesis, analysis, evaluation, and creativity. The key faculty roles, then, are mentoring and modeling learning, collaborating with students as they build learning networks, and helping students learn to self-evaluate as they develop the agency to become life-long learners.  This session will explore alternate models for understanding the faculty role drawn from digital learning models and strategies for promoting that role at the individual, departmental, and institutional level.
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Open Peer Review of New Resource for Digital Pedagogy Ends August 3

July 24, 2015 § Leave a comment

I’m excited to report that the first batch of keywords from our digital pedagogy project is now in open peer review.  Read on for details.

Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities: Concepts, Models, and Experiments, edited by Rebecca Frost Davis, Matthew K. Gold, Katherine D. Harris, and Jentery Sayers, is a dynamic open-access collection currently in development on MLA Commons. The editors invite your participation in the open peer review of this collection.
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