Educating Problem-Solvers for Our Emerging Digital Ecosystem

February 16, 2018 § Leave a comment

On Thursday, February 15, I spoke at Endicott College.  Here I share the description, slides, and references.

Description

What skills, abilities, and habits of mind do today’s graduates need for their careers and to solve complex problems in a constantly changing, globally-connected world? How can we integrate digital skills in support of critical thinking and inquiry across the curriculum? The future of higher education depends upon an integrative vision of digitally-informed learning that is not merely content delivery online but rather is education reshaped in the same ways that digital technologies have already fundamentally changed our culture. This talk will present a vision for building a curriculum that develops self-directed, digitally-augmented problem-solving from introductory to capstone level courses and prepares graduates to partner with technology to solve problems.

Slides

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Genesis of an Online General Education Capstone Course

February 12, 2018 § 1 Comment

On Friday, January 26, I presented at the annual meeting of the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AACU) along with Steve Greenlaw of Mary Washington University and Gretchen McKay of McDaniel College in a panel called, “High-Impact Educational Practices in the Online Classroom”. Mark Lieberman of Inside Higher Ed covered the session in an article, “Making an Impact in Online Courses”, published January 31, 2018. In another post, I include my section of the panel, including the introduction and my description of how I teach the general education Capstone course online at St. Edward’s University. In this post, let me clarify the genesis of the online version of this course.

Screenshot of Capstone Online welcome Video

Welcome Video for Fall 2017 Capstone online, created in Panopto

The other two panelists discussed courses of their own design, but I described my experience as an adjunct instructor teaching a course designed by other faculty. In instructional design, we call these other faculty members, subject matter experts or SMEs (pronounced “smees”). I think this is an interesting case to describe because, especially for online courses, the model of adjunct instructors teaching a course designed by full time faculty is common. At the same time, this practice is not just a result of online delivery. Any course required to be taken by all students is likely to depend on this model of faculty content owner, with other instructors (whether full time or adjunct) charged with teaching other sections of the course. The case of the Capstone Course at St. Edward’s University provides a useful illustration. « Read the rest of this entry »

My Script for High-Impact Educational Practices in the Online Classroom?

February 10, 2018 § 1 Comment

On Friday, January 26, I presented at the annual meeting of the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AACU) along with Steve Greenlaw of Mary Washington University and Gretchen McKay of McDaniel College in a panel called, “High-Impact Educational Practices in the Online Classroom”. Mark Lieberman of Inside Higher Ed covered the session in an article, “Making an Impact in Online Courses“, published January 31, 2018. In this post, I include my section of the panel, including the introduction and my description of how I teach the general education Capstone course online at St. Edward’s University. In another post, I will explain the genesis of the online version of this course.  Slides are available in a previous blogpost. « Read the rest of this entry »

Slides for High-Impact Educational Practices for the Online Classroom

January 26, 2018 § 2 Comments

 

See description and abstract in my previous blog post: High-Impact Educational Practices in the Online Classroom?

High-Impact Educational Practices in the Online Classroom?

January 19, 2018 § 2 Comments

On Friday, January 26, 2:45 – 4:00 pm in the Lafayette Park room, I’ll be co-presenting at the annual meeting of the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AACU) along with Steve Greenlaw of Mary Washington University and Gretchen McKay of McDaniel College.  Below is the  program listing along with the abstract we submitted for this session: « Read the rest of this entry »

Challenges and Strategies for Advancing New Faculty Roles

July 19, 2017 § Leave a comment

Last Wednesday (July 12), I led a session at AAC&U’s Institute for Integrative Learning and Signature Work called New Faculty Roles in the Emerging Digital Ecosystem that focused on what new roles or identities faculty play as they advance integrative and applied learning in the emerging digital ecosystem. In the second half of the session, I asked four breakout groups to pick one of the new roles we had discussed or a role they could foresee being surfaced by their projects.  Breakout groups listed barriers and discussed strategies they might pursue to address those barriers.  I also asked them to consider the roles of contingent faculty in particular.  The ultimate goal was a toolkit for redefining faculty roles on their own campus. Groups discussed the following roles:

  • Experimenter
  • Data Guru
  • Designer
  • Learning Master

Below are the results of those discussions. « Read the rest of this entry »

Community-Engaged Signature Work in the Digital Ecosystem

July 13, 2017 § Leave a comment

Today, I led another session at AAC&U’s Institute for Integrative Learning and Signature Work.  Here are slides, a description, and references. See also my last post which gives instructions and links for the activity we did in that session: Activity: Community-Engaged Signature Work in the Digital Ecosystem

What skills, abilities, and habits of mind do today’s graduates need for their careers and to solve complex problems in a constantly changing, globally-connected world? How do we integrate liberal education and authentic learning experiences with our digitally-networked context? What does community-engagement look like in a virtual community? In this session participants will consider case-studies of technology-enhanced community-engaged learning drawn from Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities: Concepts, Models, and Experiments (co-edited by the session leader) with a focus on digital pedagogy keywords such as, Community, Digital-Divides, Fieldwork, Public, Race, and Social Justice. Participants will develop a curriculum that scaffolds self-directed digitally-augmented problem-solving from introductory to capstone level courses. Participants will explore innovative pedagogies, interrogate effective models for integrating authentic learning opportunities shaped by digital tools and resources at all levels, and work collaboratively to develop a toolkit and to-do list for encouraging this type of learning on their own campus. « Read the rest of this entry »

Activity: Community-Engaged Signature Work in the Digital Ecosystem

July 13, 2017 § Leave a comment

Today, I’m leading a session at AAC&U’s Institute for Integrative Learning and Signature Work that highlights examples of community-engaged signature work many of which are drawn from Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities: Models, Concepts, and Experiments, especially the keywords,  Community, Digital Divides, Fieldwork, Online, Public, Race, and Social Justice.  This post gives directions for one of the breakout activities we’ll do in this session. « Read the rest of this entry »

New Faculty Roles in the Emerging Digital Ecosystem

July 12, 2017 § Leave a comment

Picture of Tweet by Karrie Newby: Today, I led a session at AAC&U’s Institute for Integrative Learning and Signature Work that focused on what new roles or identities faculty play as they advance integrative and applied learning in the emerging digital ecosystem.  I began with a tweet from the Institute Opening plenary that points to one new role–Academic Spotter–playing of the role of a spotter in weightlifting.  Below are the description, slides, and references from that session.  Later, I’ll post the inventory of  challenges associated with three of those identities, as well as strategies to address them that session participants developed. « Read the rest of this entry »

Digital Media Requirement at Walsh University

May 5, 2017 § Leave a comment

Today I’m at Walsh University presenting a keynote and leading a workshop to help prepare faculty for the new digital media requirement in their general education curriculum.  Every student has to take one class with a digital media designation.  In order to qualify, a class has to have a digital media (“digitized content that can be transmitted over the internet or computer networks . . . can include text, audio, video, and graphics”) project that takes more than 10 hours of work, can be shared online, involves meaningful skills, and involves creativity and working beyond typical (consumer) use of the tool.
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