Digital Humanities and Undergraduate Education

January 9, 2014 § 2 Comments

Today, I’m leading a breakout session at the workshop, Get Started in the Digital Humanities with Help from DHCommons, Thursday, 9 January, 8:30–11:30 a.m., Chicago A-B, Chicago Marriott. The session hashtag is #s3 and the conference hashtag is #mla14.

Digital Humanities and Undergraduate Education

How does digital humanities fit into the undergraduate curriculum?  This workshop will look at digital humanities from an institutional perspective, considering how it advances the learning outcomes of undergraduate education and sharing models of high impact practices from the digital humanities classroom.

Slides and References are below:

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Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities

December 11, 2013 § Leave a comment

Today, I gave a presentation at Washington and Lee University called, “Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities: Models, Keywords, Prototypes”.  The presentation kicked off the digital humanities day of the Winter Faculty Academy at Washington and Lee.  I was striving to give my vision of digital pedagogy based on a set of models from liberal arts colleges.  Slides are on Slideshare:  http://www.slideshare.net/rebeccadavis/digital-pedagogy-in-the-humanities-models-keywords-prototypes

Scroll down for references to works and models I touched on in my presentation:

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Doing Digital Humanities at Community Colleges

November 13, 2013 § Leave a comment

Last month, I had the privilege of being part of an excellent conversation about doing digital humanities at community colleges. A group of DH-experts joined community college faculty for an NEH-Office of Digital Humanities Start-Up Grant-funded workshop, “Bringing Digital Humanities to the Community College–and Vice Versa.” Anne McGrail, who organized the event, has now posted the storify:

Challenges of Blended Learning in Ancient Greek, Follow-Up

May 28, 2013 § 5 Comments

Since I posted about the challenges of finding good materials to blended learning in Introductory Ancient Greek, last Friday, I’ve found a few more resources and information to share. I’d also like to suggest some partnerships to advance this work. « Read the rest of this entry »

Developing a Curriculum for Undergraduate Work in the Digital Archives

December 17, 2012 § 1 Comment

I want to highlight a recent journal issue and a seminar from 2011 because each documents ways to engage student in applied digital work through the archives.  I’m addressing them together because I believe that combined, they suggest a model for a sequential undergraduate curriculum for digital archives.   « Read the rest of this entry »

Using Smart Technology to Increase Course Offerings in World Languages

November 5, 2012 § 2 Comments

This morning I was part of a panel at the Council of Independent Colleges Institute for Chief Academic Officers along with Allen Henderson, Provost and Senior Vice President, Texas Wesleyan University and Charlie McCormick, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Schreiner University.  We were talking about the Texas Language Consortium.  Here’s the session description and the slides are below:

Low enrollment in world language courses can prevent a college from offering a breadth of languages and depth in any single language. To help overcome this challenge, five independent colleges in Texas are using high-definition videoconferences, thereby hoping to preserve the “high touch” element that is a hallmark of education in a liberal arts college. These institutions are working with the National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education (NITLE) to explore important research and implementation issues across academic, logistical, technological, financial, and curricular dimensions. CAOs from two of the participating campuses will describe their responses to these issues and how shared programming has surmounted many obstacles to maintaining strong world language departments.

Networked Collaborative Course on Feminism and Technology

September 26, 2012 § 2 Comments

In the spirit of my post about undergraduates and crowdsourcing, here is another opportunity to get undergraduates involved in a large digital project, this time with an explicitly pedagogical focus.  The innovative FemTechNet project seeks to use technology to enable a networked conversation among, students, faculty, scholars, artists and others about the intersections of feminism and technology. By developing a distributed online collaborative course–Feminist Dialogues on Technology–which will be offered in Fall 2013, project leaders will cross global and disciplinary boundaries to create this dialogue. Please share this opportunity with any on your campus or beyond who might be interested.

This academic year (2012-2013), an international network of scholars and artists activated by Alexandra Juhasz (Professor Media Studies, Pitzer College) and Anne Balsamo (Dean of the School of Media Studies, at the New School for Public Engagement in New York) are working together to design and develop the course. I believe that this project presents an important opportunity to connect students at liberal arts colleges into a larger learning network, as we prepare them to be citizens in a globally networked world.

Campuses may join the course in a variety of ways:

  • faculty may offer an associated course on their home campus;
  • students can take the course as an independent study with local faculty members mentoring them; or
  • anyone who is interested may join as informal learners.

Currently, network members are building the course by submitting and evaluating “Boundary Objects that Learn”—the course’s basic pedagogic instruments.

To help members of the NITLE network learn more about this project, and the alternative model it presents for how liberal arts colleges might effectively counter the current drive to massive online courses (like MOOCs), NITLE will be offering a free online seminar for NITLE network members on Thursday, October 4, 4-5 pm EDT. Seminar participants will join project leaders, Alexandra Juhasz and Anne Balsamo to learn about and discuss this project. Find out more about the seminar and register online: http://www.nitle.org/live/events/144-femtechnet-the-first-docc-a-feminist-mooc For those who are not NITLE network members, please contact Juhasz or Balsamo directly or go to the FemBot Collective to find out how to get involved.

I’ve got another post brewing on the implications of this project in terms of MOOCs, academic collaboration between campuses, etc., but wanted to get this opportunity out there now.

Process Checklist for Integrating Digital Humanities Projects into Courses

September 13, 2012 § 5 Comments

In 2011 Kathyrn Tomasek and I co-taught several instances of our workshop on Integrating Digital Humanities Projects into the Undergraduate Curriculum. In the workshop, Kathryn shared her experience building the Wheaton College Digital History Project into her courses.   Together we developed this checklist to help other faculty and staff work through the process of integrating work on digital projects into a course. « Read the rest of this entry »

Crowdsourcing, Undergraduates, and Digital Humanities Projects

September 3, 2012 § 8 Comments

Crowdsourcing could be a silver bullet for integrating digital humanities methods into the undergraduate curriculum.  Why?

“Crowd” by flickr user James Cridland

Crowdsourcing means getting the general public to do tasks. Jeff Howe explains the phenomenon in “The Rise of Crowdsourcing” (Wired Magazine, June 2006) by analogy with outsourcing.  This method of labor is growing for scholarly and cultural heritage projects, and that’s where it intersects with the undergraduate curriculum.  Collaborative manuscript transcription projects, like Transcribe Bentham, have received quite a bit of the attention, but there are a variety of opportunities out there for motivated students to engage in the process of digitizing, preserving, and studying collective resources and data.  For example, the Perseus Digital Library (whose flagship collections cover the history, literature and culture of the Greco-Roman world) has drafted a call to

Advance our understanding of the Greco-Roman World! Contribute to the Scaife Digital Library — improve existing materials and to create new ones! If you want to understand the present and invent the future then FREE THE PAST!

This call lays out a variety of ways to contribute, including translation, definition, citation, text correction, manuscript transcription, text markup, mapping, and clarifying ambiguous names, words or grammar. If your students answer this call or one like it, what will they gain?  Is this just grunt labor or are their potential learning outcomes? Why is this a silver bullet for DH in the classroom? « Read the rest of this entry »

Wheaton College Digital History Project

June 25, 2012 § 2 Comments

Page spread from Laban Morey Wheaton's day book.

Page spread from Laban Morey Wheaton’s day book.

The Wheaton College Digital History Project led by Dr. Kathryn Tomasek, Associate Professor of History at Wheaton College, offers an excellent example of how to integrate a digital humanities project into the undergraduate curriculum.  Students help transcribe and markup documents from the college’s archives. Project goals include:

  • Teaching historical methods through transcription and markup of primary sources with TEI*-conformable XML**
  • Making hidden collections accessible
  • Encouraging collaborative research and pedagogy
  • Exploring the intersections of history and digital media

Find out more about the project from these sources:

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