My latest at NITLE’s Techne blog: A Digital Humanities Center for Small Liberal Arts Colleges?

September 27, 2010 § Leave a comment

Originally posted on September 27, 2010 at NITLE’s Techne blog, http://blogs.nitle.org/2010/09/27/a-digital-humanities-center-for-small-liberal-arts-colleges/

Hamilton College Digital Humanities Initiative

Last week Hamilton College rolled out the new and improved version of its Digital Humanities Initiative (DHi), funded by an $800,000 grant from the Andrew W. Mellon foundation. DHi, founded in 2009, is co-directed by Angel Nieves, Associate Professor of Africana Studies, and Janet Simons, Associate Director of Instructional Technology. They have also recently hired Gregory Lord as Lead Designer and Software Engineer.

With the new grant, Hamilton plans to build the first comprehensive digital humanities initiative at a liberal arts institution. While DHi models itself, in part, on the idea of a digital humanities center, a common structure to support digital humanities at large research universities, DHi differs with its focus on connecting digital humanities to the undergraduate experience. Faculty research projects will engage undergraduates through collaborative investigation, and undergraduate fellows will have opportunities to pursue their own research. All projects of the initiative must demonstrate a clear connection to the undergraduate curriculum, and these courses will, in turn, advance new or ongoing research. « Read the rest of this entry »

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My latest at NITLE’s Techne blog: Digital Humanities and the Undergrad

September 14, 2010 § Leave a comment

Originally posted on September 14, 2010 at NITLE’s Techne blog, http://blogs.nitle.org/2010/09/14/digital-humanities-and-the-undergrad/

In an earlier post I argued that the digital humanities are important for small liberal arts colleges because they offer opportunities to connect undergraduates to humanities research. But how do students feel about that? Recently, I had the opportunity to explore that connection with Jen Rajchel, an English major at Bryn Mawr College. Rajchel first encountered the digital humanities in a class taught by Katherine Rowe, went on to publish her thesis in CommentPress, rather than as a traditional academic paper, and this fall is organizing “Re: Humanities,” the first national research symposium dedicated to undergraduate research in digital media, November 11-12, 2010, hosted by Haverford and Bryn Mawr Colleges. Her thoughts in this video offer insights into how the digital humanities engage students in active and collaborative learning while reinforcing traditional liberal arts values.

Digital Humanities and the Undergrad

Rajchel also shared her experience in creating her online thesis. We’ll share that video in a future post. Read our other posts about digital humanities and small liberal arts colleges.

How to engage in digital humanities at small liberal arts colleges?

September 2, 2010 § Leave a comment

Originally posted on September 2, 2010 at NITLE’s Techne blog, http://blogs.nitle.org/2010/09/02/how-to-engage-in-digital-humanities-at-small-liberal-arts-colleges/

By launching a digital humanities initiative at NITLE, we signal our belief that the digital humanities are important for small liberal arts colleges. We also think that these institutions, in turn, can contribute to the digital humanities movement. In previous posts, I’ve offered some definitions for digital humanities and digital scholarship and explained the timing of our initiative. Today, I want to talk about how you can get involved with the digital humanities at small liberal arts colleges. « Read the rest of this entry »

Digital Humanities–Why Now?

September 1, 2010 § Leave a comment

Originally posted on September 1, 2010 at NITLE’s Techne blog, http://blogs.nitle.org/2010/09/01/digital-humanities-why-now/

Why launch a digital humanities initiative now? Yesterday, when I introduced NITLE’s new initiative, I spent some time defining digital humanities and digital scholarship. Today, I’ll take a crack at the “why now” question, specifically for liberal arts colleges. (Tomorrow, I’ll explore why the digital humanities matter for liberal arts colleges and offer some ways for those at small liberal arts colleges to get involved and take action.)

Why Now?

So, why should we look at the digital humanities now, especially on the small liberal arts college campus? To answer this question, first we must look at the larger context of higher education. The digital humanities have been moving through the academy. « Read the rest of this entry »

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