Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities

December 11, 2013 § Leave a comment

Today, I gave a presentation at Washington and Lee University called, “Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities: Models, Keywords, Prototypes”.  The presentation kicked off the digital humanities day of the Winter Faculty Academy at Washington and Lee.  I was striving to give my vision of digital pedagogy based on a set of models from liberal arts colleges.  Slides are on Slideshare:  http://www.slideshare.net/rebeccadavis/digital-pedagogy-in-the-humanities-models-keywords-prototypes

Scroll down for references to works and models I touched on in my presentation:

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Reflections on a Text Analysis Assignment

November 12, 2013 § 2 Comments

Word Cloud of a Translation of Vergil's Aeneid

Word Cloud of a Translation of Vergil’s Aeneid

In Spring 2013, I taught LAT312K: Intermediate Latin at the University of Texas-Austin.  This was the fourth and last required course in the Latin sequence at UT and focused on Vergil’s Aeneid.  The course functioned both as a cap to a student’s Latin experience (several of my students were graduating seniors finishing off their required courses) and a gateway into advanced study of Latin literature and culture for Classics majors.  One of my goals in the course was introducing students to a variety of approaches scholars take to the study of Latin literature in general and Vergil’s Aeneid in particular. This goal allowed me to include a digital humanities element in the course by having my students experiment with digital methodologies.  One such assignment focused on text analysis.  I include the assignment below, as well as my reflections on how this pedagogical experiment went. « Read the rest of this entry »

Using Disruption to Stay on Course

August 21, 2013 § Leave a comment

Tomorrow, Thursday, August 22, I’ll be presenting as part of the Opening Plenary panel of the St. Edward’s Annual Teaching Symposium.  Below are my slides for the symposium the description of the plenary panel, and resources for my presentation.

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Surveying Digital Humanities at Small Liberal Arts Colleges

August 19, 2013 § Leave a comment

During the academic year 2012-2013, I conducted a survey about the motivations and practices of digital humanities at small liberal arts colleges.  Last month at the annual Digital Humanities Conference, I shared some results of that survey in a panel session on the Future of Undergraduate Digital Humanities, organized by Brian Croxall and Kate Singer.  You can see my slides from that presentation here:

Opening a Conversation about Undergraduate Research

February 1, 2013 § Leave a comment

In my experience one of the key appeals of digital humanities at small liberal arts colleges is the opportunity for undergraduates to do applied, authentic research in the humanities. Last week at the annual meeting of the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U), I had the pleasure of being part of a panel (with Daniel Chamberlain, Jeff McClurken, and Jim Proctor) showcasing undergraduate research using digital tools and methodologies both in the digital humanities and beyond.  I had actually titled the panel, “Undergraduates as Public Digital Scholars” in hopes of attracting the attention of those interested in undergraduate research, one of the high impact practices for liberal education advocated by AAC&U. « Read the rest of this entry »

NITLE Survey on Digital Humanities at Small Liberal Arts Colleges

November 9, 2012 § Leave a comment

Interest in digital humanities, digital scholarship, and digital methodologies is growing at liberal arts colleges. To monitor that growth and explore its implications for liberal arts colleges, the National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education (NITLE) is gathering information about digital humanities at small liberal arts colleges. We invite faculty, staff, administrators and others at small liberal arts colleges to complete our online survey on this topic. Please also share the survey with your colleagues.  We welcome multiple results from the same institution.   Any information you can provide will be appreciated, even if you cannot answer every question.

NITLE Survey on Digital Humanities at Small Liberal Arts Colleges: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/NITLEDHSurvey

Results from this survey will update the research on digital humanities at small liberal arts colleges, that went into this publication:

Alexander, Bryan, and Rebecca Frost Davis. “Should Liberal Arts Campuses Do Digital Humanities? Process and Products in the Small College World.” In Debates in the Digital Humanities, edited by Matthew K. Gold. University of Minnesota Press, 2012.

Research Statement

This is a research project being conducted by Rebecca Frost Davis, NITLE Program Officer for the Humanities.  Your participation in this research study is voluntary and you may withdraw at any time without penalty. We anticipate that this survey will take no more than 15-20 minutes to complete.

Information from this survey will be used in the following way:

  • Aggregate data will be shared with the NITLE network and published openly
  • Responses indicating levels of institutional engagement in digital humanities and that would generally be available publicly, e.g., existence of a digital humanities center, courses offered, individual or institutional projects, may be shared with the NITLE network and published openly, under the names of individual institutions
  • Individual responses that reflect a respondent’s opinion (qualitative responses) will not be shared, published, quoted, etc., without prior consent although aggregate information about and analysis of such responses may be shared and published

We will do our best to keep your information confidential. All data is stored in a password protected electronic format. The results of this study will be used for scholarly purposes only and may be shared with NITLE representatives.

My latest at NITLE’s Techne blog: Undergraduate Research and Digital Scholarship

October 15, 2012 § Leave a comment

Originally posted on October 15, 2012 at 01:25PM at Techne, http://blogs.nitle.org/2012/10/15/undergraduate-research-and-digital-scholarship/

How can we prepare our students to be citizens in a networked world? One solution is to give them occasions for action in that world through authentic research using digital methodologies.  Let them explore wicked problems that cross disciplinary lines and don’t have clear solutions.  Engage them in collaborative research involving both students and faculty members. Involve them in projects driven by community needs and mentor them through that work.  All of these answers highlight the value of liberal education in a world of webs and networks because these are the kinds of opportunities offered by small liberal arts colleges rather than large-scale, industrial MOOCs. « Read the rest of this entry »

How Humanists Read and Why We Need a Better (Electronic) Reading Ecosystem

October 10, 2012 § 4 Comments

I just completed an interesting and brief survey on humanities reading practices from Aditi Muralidharan. If you complete the survey, you can see the aggregate survey results. The survey asks questions about whether you copy out snippets of text that you are reading. I found that my reading practices seem similar to many other humanists in the fact that I do copy out snippets, how long they are, and how I use them.  Behind this survey, I hope I’m seeing the promise of improved tools to suport humanities research practices. « Read the rest of this entry »

My latest at NITLE’s Techne blog: Upcoming Digital Humanities Training for Textual Research

August 24, 2012 § Leave a comment

Originally posted on August 24, 2012 at NITLE’s Techne blog, http://blogs.nitle.org/2012/08/24/upcoming-digital-humanities-training-for-textual-research/

This installment of NITLE’s series on Building Capacity in Digital Humanities within the NITLE Network, focuses on upcoming training opportunities for liberal arts faculty and staff.

One of the biggest challenges for liberal arts colleges seeking to build capacity in digital humanities is training faculty and staff in new digital methods, especially due to the wide variety of methods that fall under the big tent of digital humanities and the lack of local expertise at small colleges.  Since many digital humanities centers at large research institutions do offer such training, small colleges can take advantage of these resources to build capacity in digital methodologies, though there will be some cost involved. « Read the rest of this entry »

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