Digital Pedagogy in the Liberal Arts

February 6, 2014 § 1 Comment

Today, I am delivering a talk at Whittier College called, “Digital Pedagogy in the Liberal Arts: Models, Keywords, and Prototypes”.

Slides are here:

Scroll down for references and links to models:

« Read the rest of this entry »

Mapping Technology Use for Teaching and Learning

April 6, 2013 § 1 Comment

Earlier this afternoon I gave a presentation called “Mapping Technology Use for Teaching and Learning at Liberal Arts Colleges” at a faculty workshop of the Great Lakes Colleges Association, “Hybrid Thinking About The Role of Technology For Liberal Education.” The slides are available online:

I include references and links below. « Read the rest of this entry »

Yes, Undergrads Can Do Digital Humanities

April 3, 2013 § 1 Comment

Davidson student, Ayesha Shah ’13, leads elementary students through her geotagged math map service-learning project.

When I first started researching digital humanities at liberal arts colleges I was dismayed to hear a comment made at the 2010 Digital Humanities Conference in London: “There is no place for undergrads in Digital Humanities.” That is manifestly untrue.  Here’s some of the proof that’s come through my inbox this week of undegraduates doing digital humanities and other forms of digital scholarship. « Read the rest of this entry »

Developing a Curriculum for Undergraduate Work in the Digital Archives

December 17, 2012 § 1 Comment

I want to highlight a recent journal issue and a seminar from 2011 because each documents ways to engage student in applied digital work through the archives.  I’m addressing them together because I believe that combined, they suggest a model for a sequential undergraduate curriculum for digital archives.   « Read the rest of this entry »

Undergrads Do Archaeology, Civic Engagement and Digital Humanities

September 17, 2012 § 1 Comment

Undergraduates at Hamilton College are participating in an archaeological dig led by Prof. Nathan Goodale. This project illustrates the variety of learning experiences and high impact practices that can come from engaging undergraduates in collaborative research with faculty using digital methodologies.  Not only do students engage in collaborative, student-faculty research, they also see the public impact of that research as it is being used by Sinxit activists to support claims to their ancestral land. The project is part of Hamilton College’s Digital Humanities Initiative, and uses digital techniques such as a digital database of cultural and linguistic information, iPads for data collection in the field, 3-D Modeling of Sinxit buildings, and a film about the Sinxit, past and present. When I interviewed Prof. Goodale in 2010 during a visit to Hamilton College to learn about DHi, it became clear to me that he wasn’t striving to be at the cutting edge of digital humanities research and teaching.  Rather, his project uses the best tools available and those tools happen to be digital.  That lesson is far more important to undergrads, whether they identify themselves as digital humanists or not.

Read more about it in this story from the Chronicle of Higher Education: Archae0logists Uncover Markers of an ‘Extinct’ Ancient Tribe on Contested Land. (Note that this is a premium article, so, unfortunately the link above expires in 5 days).

Crowdsourcing, Undergraduates, and Digital Humanities Projects

September 3, 2012 § 10 Comments

Crowdsourcing could be a silver bullet for integrating digital humanities methods into the undergraduate curriculum.  Why?

“Crowd” by flickr user James Cridland

Crowdsourcing means getting the general public to do tasks. Jeff Howe explains the phenomenon in “The Rise of Crowdsourcing” (Wired Magazine, June 2006) by analogy with outsourcing.  This method of labor is growing for scholarly and cultural heritage projects, and that’s where it intersects with the undergraduate curriculum.  Collaborative manuscript transcription projects, like Transcribe Bentham, have received quite a bit of the attention, but there are a variety of opportunities out there for motivated students to engage in the process of digitizing, preserving, and studying collective resources and data.  For example, the Perseus Digital Library (whose flagship collections cover the history, literature and culture of the Greco-Roman world) has drafted a call to

Advance our understanding of the Greco-Roman World! Contribute to the Scaife Digital Library — improve existing materials and to create new ones! If you want to understand the present and invent the future then FREE THE PAST!

This call lays out a variety of ways to contribute, including translation, definition, citation, text correction, manuscript transcription, text markup, mapping, and clarifying ambiguous names, words or grammar. If your students answer this call or one like it, what will they gain?  Is this just grunt labor or are their potential learning outcomes? Why is this a silver bullet for DH in the classroom? « Read the rest of this entry »

My latest at NITLE’s Techne blog: What is Digital Field Scholarship?

August 17, 2012 § 1 Comment

Originally posted on August 17, 2012 at NITLE’s Techne blog, http://blogs.nitle.org/2012/08/17/what-is-digital-field-scholarship/

The Domain of Digital Field Scholarship

The Domain of Digital Field Scholarship

On August 29 at 4 pm EDT Prof. Jim Proctor of Lewis and Clark College will lead a NITLE Seminar on digital field scholarship and offer the opportunity for faculty and staff in the NITLE network to join a sandbox and experiment with this approach over the next academic year.  Some of you may be wondering what, exactly, digital field scholarship is and why it is important for liberal arts colleges. « Read the rest of this entry »

My latest at NITLE’s Techne blog: Doing It

August 23, 2011 § Leave a comment

Originally posted on August 23, 2011 at NITLE’s Techne blog, http://blogs.nitle.org/2011/08/23/doing-it/

photo from flickr user: DonkeyHotey

Lately I’ve been noticing an emphasis in higher education on doing and producing. You see it manifested at all academic levels—students learn through hands-on projects, faculty get evaluated based on productivity, universities boast of patents generated and parents want colleges to prepare their children to do something with their life (read “get a job”). « Read the rest of this entry »

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