Slides for Using Disruption to Stay on Course (for Liberal Education)

January 22, 2014 § Leave a comment

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Using Disruption to Stay on Course (for Liberal Education)

January 22, 2014 § Leave a comment

AACU-logo_largeThis afternoon I’m teaching a workshop called “Using Disruption to Stay on Course (for Liberal Education)” at the annual meeting of the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U). I’ve posted materials for this workshop to my blog, linked from the page called Using Disruption.  My basic premise for the workshop is that, although technological changes are disrupting higher education, colleges and universities can find ways to adapt these disruptions to the service of liberal education.  In the workshop I’ll share some models of colleges who have done just that, ask the participants to reflect on disruption at their own campus, set up breakout discussions of individual disruptions in the context of liberal education, and then we’ll work as a group to develop some recommendations.  « Read the rest of this entry »

Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities

December 11, 2013 § Leave a comment

Today, I gave a presentation at Washington and Lee University called, “Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities: Models, Keywords, Prototypes”.  The presentation kicked off the digital humanities day of the Winter Faculty Academy at Washington and Lee.  I was striving to give my vision of digital pedagogy based on a set of models from liberal arts colleges.  Slides are on Slideshare:  http://www.slideshare.net/rebeccadavis/digital-pedagogy-in-the-humanities-models-keywords-prototypes

Scroll down for references to works and models I touched on in my presentation:

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Mapping Technology Use for Teaching and Learning

April 6, 2013 § 1 Comment

Earlier this afternoon I gave a presentation called “Mapping Technology Use for Teaching and Learning at Liberal Arts Colleges” at a faculty workshop of the Great Lakes Colleges Association, “Hybrid Thinking About The Role of Technology For Liberal Education.” The slides are available online:

I include references and links below. « Read the rest of this entry »

My Latest at AAC&U’s Liberal.education Nation: Learning from the AAC&U Network

February 8, 2012 § Leave a comment

Originally posted February 8, 2012 at AAC&U’s Liberal.education Nation, http://blog.aacu.org/index.php/2012/02/08/learning-from-the-aacu-network/.

I’m seeing networks everywhere these days. There’s the obvious one—the Internet—but, there is also a growing trend in of studying networks, and not just social networks like Facebook , but also in literature, like the network of relationships between characters in Hamlet.  AAC&U has its Network for Academic RenewalNITLE works with a network of small liberal arts colleges, and our students are facing a world of webs and networks, as I described in a blog post last year. « Read the rest of this entry »

My latest at NITLE’s Techne blog: Finding a Place for the Liberal Arts in a Networked World

February 9, 2011 § Leave a comment

Originally posted on February 9, 2011 at NITLE’s Techne blog, http://blogs.nitle.org/2011/02/09/finding-a-place-for-the-liberal-arts-in-a-networked-world/

Global Network by Flickr User WebWizzard

Physical places—the classroom, the home campus, the local community—hold great importance for small liberal arts colleges because they signify a particular model of higher education. The current debate about the future of higher education sets this model of the traditional, high touch, face-to-face classroom in opposition to the technology-enabled, global networked world made possible by the Internet. Can we maintain the importance of these places while moving from a world of walls and silos to one of webs and networks as Mark Taylor, the opening forum speaker of the recent annual meeting of the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) and author of Crisis on Campus told us we should? Do we really have to move?

At that same AAC&U conference a group of chief academic officers from fourteen small liberal arts colleges gathered to address those questions. NITLE worked with Carol Long, provost and vice president for academic affairs at SUNY-Geneseo, and Katie Conboy, provost and vice president for academic affairs at Stonehill College to organize the meeting, at which participants envisioned how their campuses would look in ten years and identified strategic areas requiring new prototypes. In “Chief Academic Officer 2.5,” a thought piece shared in advance as groundwork for discussion, Long and Conboy point to the dual environments of their institutions—the physical and the digital—that demand “a new institutional reality” and call on their colleagues to “to take the lead in shaping and articulating that reality.” « Read the rest of this entry »

My Latest at AAC&U’s Liberal.education Nation: Four Strategies for Liberal Education in a Networked World

February 2, 2011 § Leave a comment

Originally published February 2, 2011 at AAC&U’s Liberal.education Nation, http://blog.aacu.org/index.php/2011/02/02/four-strategies-for-liberal-education-in-a-networked-world/

Can we preserve and transform liberal education for a networked world?  The opening forum of the 2011 AAC&U Annual Meeting raised this question, and I saw affirmative answers and strategies throughout the conference. « Read the rest of this entry »

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