My Latest at AAC&U’s Liberal.education Nation: Technology and Liberal Education: Yes and…

February 25, 2013 § 2 Comments

Originally posted February 25, 2013 at AAC&U’s Liberal.education Nation, http://blog.aacu.org/index.php/2013/02/25/technology-and-liberal-education-yes-and

The theme of this year’s [AAC&U] annual meeting, “Innovations, Efficiencies, and Disruptions—To What Ends?,” includes rapid technological advancement in the list of challenges facing higher education today. This advancement offers alternative delivery methods that promise to lower costs but also require substantial investment in infrastructure. It promises to enhance learning both in and out of the classroom. At the same time, new digital methodologies are changing the face of the disciplines and reshaping academic practice.   Our students face a world in which knowledge is created and shared by both amateurs and professionals, in multiple media, across digital networks, spanning domains and communities. Living, working, and civically engaging in this context is materially different than it was fifty years ago. In particular, the change in agency in this participatory culturechallenges existing professional expertise by democratizing the creation of knowledge.  At the same time, the openness and dissemination enabled by digital networks threatens the traditional model of higher education—content experts passing knowledge in a controlled setting down to their students—by having one expert sharing expertise with everyone’s students. Combined with alternative methods of credentialing, such as badges, competencies, or prior learning assessments, these developments put pressure on one of the core elements of the higher education business model. « Read the rest of this entry »

Opening a Conversation about Undergraduate Research

February 1, 2013 § Leave a comment

In my experience one of the key appeals of digital humanities at small liberal arts colleges is the opportunity for undergraduates to do applied, authentic research in the humanities. Last week at the annual meeting of the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U), I had the pleasure of being part of a panel (with Daniel Chamberlain, Jeff McClurken, and Jim Proctor) showcasing undergraduate research using digital tools and methodologies both in the digital humanities and beyond.  I had actually titled the panel, “Undergraduates as Public Digital Scholars” in hopes of attracting the attention of those interested in undergraduate research, one of the high impact practices for liberal education advocated by AAC&U. « Read the rest of this entry »

My Latest at AAC&U’s Liberal.education Nation: HEDs Up Sessions—Why We Fight

January 30, 2013 § Leave a comment

Originally posted January 29, 2013 at AAC&U’s Liberal.education Nation, http://blog.aacu.org/index.php/2013/01/29/heds-up-sessions-why-we-fight/

Friday morning at the 2013 AAC&U Annual Meeting, I attended a series of HEDs Up presentations, a format inspired by TED talks. I’ve found these to be a refreshing break from most conference papers—even those at AAC&U, which are often more interactive than other conferences—because they are designed to be engaging and entertaining.  The brief time limit—just ten minutes—means that speakers must focus on one core message. This format offers the chance to communicate your beliefs about issues that really matter to you, your core ideas, your big questions. « Read the rest of this entry »

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