Open Peer Review of New Resource for Digital Pedagogy Ends August 3

July 24, 2015 § Leave a comment

I’m excited to report that the first batch of keywords from our digital pedagogy project is now in open peer review.  Read on for details.

Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities: Concepts, Models, and Experiments, edited by Rebecca Frost Davis, Matthew K. Gold, Katherine D. Harris, and Jentery Sayers, is a dynamic open-access collection currently in development on MLA Commons. The editors invite your participation in the open peer review of this collection.
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Tanner Talks: Information and Access: Sharing Knowledge Across Virtual Communities

March 3, 2014 § Leave a comment

Last October, during Open Access Week, I participated in a stimulating panel as part of the “2013–14 Tanner Talks: Information and Access: Sharing Knowledge Across Virtual Communities” at Utah State University on Wednesday, October 23, 2013.  Here is the description:

Peter Binfield (physicist & publisher of PeerJ, an open-access journal), Rebecca Frost Davis (an expert on digital humanities at St. Edward’s University) and Adam Moore (an expert on information ethics at University of Washington) will discuss the terms, the movements, and the philosophical impetus for and potential shortcomings of higher education as it becomes “digital” and “open.” The 2013–14 Tanner Talks, a series of cross-disciplinary events focusing on the theme “Knowledge and Community,” are a presentation of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences.

My role on the panel was to address Digital Humanities and Open Access.  I was asked to prepare answers to these questions in advance:

  • What are the benefits and costs of open access and increasing digitization of academic work?
  • What is the relationship between Digital Humanities and open access?
  • How is the Digital Humanities movement changing scholarship and teaching?

The video for this panel is available online as a video podcast from Utah State University.

For those who watch the video–my notes were on my iPhone.  I wasn’t texting or checking email throughout the panel.

My experience in this panel led me to better articulate for myself what I’ve been discussing in subsequent talks as the change in the knowledge economy from a model of scarcity to one of abundance and the challenges of adjusting to that change, especially as they relate to scholarship and other academic practices.

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