Using Disruption to Stay on Course (for Liberal Education)

January 22, 2014 § Leave a comment

AACU-logo_largeThis afternoon I’m teaching a workshop called “Using Disruption to Stay on Course (for Liberal Education)” at the annual meeting of the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U). I’ve posted materials for this workshop to my blog, linked from the page called Using Disruption.  My basic premise for the workshop is that, although technological changes are disrupting higher education, colleges and universities can find ways to adapt these disruptions to the service of liberal education.  In the workshop I’ll share some models of colleges who have done just that, ask the participants to reflect on disruption at their own campus, set up breakout discussions of individual disruptions in the context of liberal education, and then we’ll work as a group to develop some recommendations.  « Read the rest of this entry »

Digital Reading Practices for the Liberal Arts Classroom

November 12, 2013 § Leave a comment

Reading and Annotating on My iPad with iAnnotate PDF

Reading and Annotating on My iPad with iAnnotate PDF

Today I’m leading a Tech Snack at. St. Edward’s University on “Digital Reading Practices for the Liberal Arts Classroom.”  Tech Snacks bring together faculty members, instructional technology staff, and others at St. Edward’s University to discuss the pedagogical uses of various technologies.  This tech snack will look at ways that reading has changed in the digital age.  My title is borrowed from a NITLE Seminar I organized last year in which  Stéfan Sinclair and Geoffrey Rockwell introduced the NITLE community to computer-assisted text analysis via Voyant Tools.  When I first proposed this topic, I imagined that I would discuss how I had tried an assignment built around this methodology for the intermediate Latin class on Vergil’s Aeneid that I taught last Spring.  I still plan on sharing this example as a way of exploring how computers can offer a different way into the close reading that we typically teach in the literature classroom. That is, computer-assisted text analysis is one of the new methodologies championed by the digital humanities community.  But, I also want to spend some time discussing how we might continue traditional reading practices in a digital environment.  How do we translate our analog, print reading practices into a digital world and what other affordances might that environment offer? « Read the rest of this entry »

How Humanists Read and Why We Need a Better (Electronic) Reading Ecosystem

October 10, 2012 § 4 Comments

I just completed an interesting and brief survey on humanities reading practices from Aditi Muralidharan. If you complete the survey, you can see the aggregate survey results. The survey asks questions about whether you copy out snippets of text that you are reading. I found that my reading practices seem similar to many other humanists in the fact that I do copy out snippets, how long they are, and how I use them.  Behind this survey, I hope I’m seeing the promise of improved tools to suport humanities research practices. « Read the rest of this entry »

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