Tanner Talks: Information and Access: Sharing Knowledge Across Virtual Communities

March 3, 2014 § Leave a comment

Last October, during Open Access Week, I participated in a stimulating panel as part of the “2013–14 Tanner Talks: Information and Access: Sharing Knowledge Across Virtual Communities” at Utah State University on Wednesday, October 23, 2013.  Here is the description:

Peter Binfield (physicist & publisher of PeerJ, an open-access journal), Rebecca Frost Davis (an expert on digital humanities at St. Edward’s University) and Adam Moore (an expert on information ethics at University of Washington) will discuss the terms, the movements, and the philosophical impetus for and potential shortcomings of higher education as it becomes “digital” and “open.” The 2013–14 Tanner Talks, a series of cross-disciplinary events focusing on the theme “Knowledge and Community,” are a presentation of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences.

My role on the panel was to address Digital Humanities and Open Access.  I was asked to prepare answers to these questions in advance:

  • What are the benefits and costs of open access and increasing digitization of academic work?
  • What is the relationship between Digital Humanities and open access?
  • How is the Digital Humanities movement changing scholarship and teaching?

The video for this panel is available online as a video podcast from Utah State University.

For those who watch the video–my notes were on my iPhone.  I wasn’t texting or checking email throughout the panel.

My experience in this panel led me to better articulate for myself what I’ve been discussing in subsequent talks as the change in the knowledge economy from a model of scarcity to one of abundance and the challenges of adjusting to that change, especially as they relate to scholarship and other academic practices.

Disruptive Innovations in Learning Technologies

November 13, 2013 § Leave a comment

I’m speaking tomorrow at the Brazos Valley Chapter of ASTD.

Below are a description of the talk and my slides:

A variety of technology-enabled learning modes are changing the landscape of higher education.  How might these changes impact the training and development profession? Rebecca Frost Davis, Director of Instructional and Emerging Technology at St. Edward’s University will review developments in technology-enabled learning that are disrupting the traditional model of higher education, including the massive open online course or MOOC, blended learning, big data, and open educational resources. Participants will then explore how these disruptions might affect their approach to workforce training and development.

Challenges of Blended Learning in Ancient Greek, Follow-Up

May 28, 2013 § 5 Comments

Since I posted about the challenges of finding good materials to blended learning in Introductory Ancient Greek, last Friday, I’ve found a few more resources and information to share. I’d also like to suggest some partnerships to advance this work. « Read the rest of this entry »

Challenges of Blended Learning in the Humanities: Ancient Greek

May 24, 2013 § Leave a comment

Earlier this week, I received a query about available resources for teaching Ancient Greek online that would enable a hybrid or blended approach to teaching beginning Greek.  My experience tracking down those resources is a useful demonstration of the challenges still faced by many humanities disciplines in implementing the hybrid or blended approach. In this blog post, I’m going to share my results and reflect on those challenges. « Read the rest of this entry »

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