Genesis of an Online General Education Capstone Course

February 12, 2018 § 1 Comment

On Friday, January 26, I presented at the annual meeting of the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AACU) along with Steve Greenlaw of Mary Washington University and Gretchen McKay of McDaniel College in a panel called, “High-Impact Educational Practices in the Online Classroom”. Mark Lieberman of Inside Higher Ed covered the session in an article, “Making an Impact in Online Courses”, published January 31, 2018. In another post, I include my section of the panel, including the introduction and my description of how I teach the general education Capstone course online at St. Edward’s University. In this post, let me clarify the genesis of the online version of this course.

Screenshot of Capstone Online welcome Video

Welcome Video for Fall 2017 Capstone online, created in Panopto

The other two panelists discussed courses of their own design, but I described my experience as an adjunct instructor teaching a course designed by other faculty. In instructional design, we call these other faculty members, subject matter experts or SMEs (pronounced “smees”). I think this is an interesting case to describe because, especially for online courses, the model of adjunct instructors teaching a course designed by full time faculty is common. At the same time, this practice is not just a result of online delivery. Any course required to be taken by all students is likely to depend on this model of faculty content owner, with other instructors (whether full time or adjunct) charged with teaching other sections of the course. The case of the Capstone Course at St. Edward’s University provides a useful illustration. « Read the rest of this entry »

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My Script for High-Impact Educational Practices in the Online Classroom?

February 10, 2018 § 1 Comment

On Friday, January 26, I presented at the annual meeting of the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AACU) along with Steve Greenlaw of Mary Washington University and Gretchen McKay of McDaniel College in a panel called, “High-Impact Educational Practices in the Online Classroom”. Mark Lieberman of Inside Higher Ed covered the session in an article, “Making an Impact in Online Courses“, published January 31, 2018. In this post, I include my section of the panel, including the introduction and my description of how I teach the general education Capstone course online at St. Edward’s University. In another post, I will explain the genesis of the online version of this course.  Slides are available in a previous blogpost. « Read the rest of this entry »

Slides for High-Impact Educational Practices for the Online Classroom

January 26, 2018 § 2 Comments

 

See description and abstract in my previous blog post: High-Impact Educational Practices in the Online Classroom?

High-Impact Educational Practices in the Online Classroom?

January 19, 2018 § 2 Comments

On Friday, January 26, 2:45 – 4:00 pm in the Lafayette Park room, I’ll be co-presenting at the annual meeting of the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AACU) along with Steve Greenlaw of Mary Washington University and Gretchen McKay of McDaniel College.  Below is the  program listing along with the abstract we submitted for this session: « Read the rest of this entry »

Digital Pedagogy in the Liberal Arts

February 6, 2014 § 1 Comment

Today, I am delivering a talk at Whittier College called, “Digital Pedagogy in the Liberal Arts: Models, Keywords, and Prototypes”.

Slides are here:

Scroll down for references and links to models:

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Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities

December 11, 2013 § Leave a comment

Today, I gave a presentation at Washington and Lee University called, “Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities: Models, Keywords, Prototypes”.  The presentation kicked off the digital humanities day of the Winter Faculty Academy at Washington and Lee.  I was striving to give my vision of digital pedagogy based on a set of models from liberal arts colleges.  Slides are on Slideshare:  http://www.slideshare.net/rebeccadavis/digital-pedagogy-in-the-humanities-models-keywords-prototypes

Scroll down for references to works and models I touched on in my presentation:

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Using Disruption to Stay on Course

August 21, 2013 § Leave a comment

Tomorrow, Thursday, August 22, I’ll be presenting as part of the Opening Plenary panel of the St. Edward’s Annual Teaching Symposium.  Below are my slides for the symposium the description of the plenary panel, and resources for my presentation.

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Mapping Technology Use for Teaching and Learning

April 6, 2013 § 1 Comment

Earlier this afternoon I gave a presentation called “Mapping Technology Use for Teaching and Learning at Liberal Arts Colleges” at a faculty workshop of the Great Lakes Colleges Association, “Hybrid Thinking About The Role of Technology For Liberal Education.” The slides are available online:

I include references and links below. « Read the rest of this entry »

Yes, Undergrads Can Do Digital Humanities

April 3, 2013 § 1 Comment

Davidson student, Ayesha Shah ’13, leads elementary students through her geotagged math map service-learning project.

When I first started researching digital humanities at liberal arts colleges I was dismayed to hear a comment made at the 2010 Digital Humanities Conference in London: “There is no place for undergrads in Digital Humanities.” That is manifestly untrue.  Here’s some of the proof that’s come through my inbox this week of undegraduates doing digital humanities and other forms of digital scholarship. « Read the rest of this entry »

Opening a Conversation about Undergraduate Research

February 1, 2013 § Leave a comment

In my experience one of the key appeals of digital humanities at small liberal arts colleges is the opportunity for undergraduates to do applied, authentic research in the humanities. Last week at the annual meeting of the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U), I had the pleasure of being part of a panel (with Daniel Chamberlain, Jeff McClurken, and Jim Proctor) showcasing undergraduate research using digital tools and methodologies both in the digital humanities and beyond.  I had actually titled the panel, “Undergraduates as Public Digital Scholars” in hopes of attracting the attention of those interested in undergraduate research, one of the high impact practices for liberal education advocated by AAC&U. « Read the rest of this entry »

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