Using Disruption to Stay on Course (for Liberal Education)

January 22, 2014 § Leave a comment

AACU-logo_largeThis afternoon I’m teaching a workshop called “Using Disruption to Stay on Course (for Liberal Education)” at the annual meeting of the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U). I’ve posted materials for this workshop to my blog, linked from the page called Using Disruption.  My basic premise for the workshop is that, although technological changes are disrupting higher education, colleges and universities can find ways to adapt these disruptions to the service of liberal education.  In the workshop I’ll share some models of colleges who have done just that, ask the participants to reflect on disruption at their own campus, set up breakout discussions of individual disruptions in the context of liberal education, and then we’ll work as a group to develop some recommendations.  « Read the rest of this entry »

MOOCs, Boutique Subjects, and Marginal Approaches

January 10, 2014 § Leave a comment

Today I’m part of panel #s399 at #mla14 on MOOCs, Boutique Subjects, and Marginal Approaches.  This roundtable addresses what happens to marginal approaches (e.g., feminist, queer, disability, racial) and boutique subjects (e.g., medieval studies) in the MOOC paradigm.

My slides are below with references further down:

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Disruptive Innovations in Learning Technologies

November 13, 2013 § Leave a comment

I’m speaking tomorrow at the Brazos Valley Chapter of ASTD.

Below are a description of the talk and my slides:

A variety of technology-enabled learning modes are changing the landscape of higher education.  How might these changes impact the training and development profession? Rebecca Frost Davis, Director of Instructional and Emerging Technology at St. Edward’s University will review developments in technology-enabled learning that are disrupting the traditional model of higher education, including the massive open online course or MOOC, blended learning, big data, and open educational resources. Participants will then explore how these disruptions might affect their approach to workforce training and development.

Using Disruption to Stay on Course

August 21, 2013 § Leave a comment

Tomorrow, Thursday, August 22, I’ll be presenting as part of the Opening Plenary panel of the St. Edward’s Annual Teaching Symposium.  Below are my slides for the symposium the description of the plenary panel, and resources for my presentation.

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Mapping Technology Use for Teaching and Learning

April 6, 2013 § 1 Comment

Earlier this afternoon I gave a presentation called “Mapping Technology Use for Teaching and Learning at Liberal Arts Colleges” at a faculty workshop of the Great Lakes Colleges Association, “Hybrid Thinking About The Role of Technology For Liberal Education.” The slides are available online:

I include references and links below. « Read the rest of this entry »

My Latest at AAC&U’s Liberal.education Nation: Technology and Liberal Education: Yes and…

February 25, 2013 § 2 Comments

Originally posted February 25, 2013 at AAC&U’s Liberal.education Nation, http://blog.aacu.org/index.php/2013/02/25/technology-and-liberal-education-yes-and

The theme of this year’s [AAC&U] annual meeting, “Innovations, Efficiencies, and Disruptions—To What Ends?,” includes rapid technological advancement in the list of challenges facing higher education today. This advancement offers alternative delivery methods that promise to lower costs but also require substantial investment in infrastructure. It promises to enhance learning both in and out of the classroom. At the same time, new digital methodologies are changing the face of the disciplines and reshaping academic practice.   Our students face a world in which knowledge is created and shared by both amateurs and professionals, in multiple media, across digital networks, spanning domains and communities. Living, working, and civically engaging in this context is materially different than it was fifty years ago. In particular, the change in agency in this participatory culturechallenges existing professional expertise by democratizing the creation of knowledge.  At the same time, the openness and dissemination enabled by digital networks threatens the traditional model of higher education—content experts passing knowledge in a controlled setting down to their students—by having one expert sharing expertise with everyone’s students. Combined with alternative methods of credentialing, such as badges, competencies, or prior learning assessments, these developments put pressure on one of the core elements of the higher education business model. « Read the rest of this entry »

Mentored MOOCs for Global Learning?

February 22, 2013 § 3 Comments

Global Network

Global Network by Flickr User WebWizzard

Yesterday Coursera announced that it would have courses available in four languages; in addition to English, it now has courses in French, Spanish, Chinese and Italian. Does this mean Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) could provide a global learning opportunity for students in the United States, and if so, how might that work? « Read the rest of this entry »

My Latest at AAC&U’s Liberal.education Nation: HEDs Up Sessions—Why We Fight

January 30, 2013 § Leave a comment

Originally posted January 29, 2013 at AAC&U’s Liberal.education Nation, http://blog.aacu.org/index.php/2013/01/29/heds-up-sessions-why-we-fight/

Friday morning at the 2013 AAC&U Annual Meeting, I attended a series of HEDs Up presentations, a format inspired by TED talks. I’ve found these to be a refreshing break from most conference papers—even those at AAC&U, which are often more interactive than other conferences—because they are designed to be engaging and entertaining.  The brief time limit—just ten minutes—means that speakers must focus on one core message. This format offers the chance to communicate your beliefs about issues that really matter to you, your core ideas, your big questions. « Read the rest of this entry »

Networked Collaborative Course on Feminism and Technology

September 26, 2012 § 2 Comments

In the spirit of my post about undergraduates and crowdsourcing, here is another opportunity to get undergraduates involved in a large digital project, this time with an explicitly pedagogical focus.  The innovative FemTechNet project seeks to use technology to enable a networked conversation among, students, faculty, scholars, artists and others about the intersections of feminism and technology. By developing a distributed online collaborative course–Feminist Dialogues on Technology–which will be offered in Fall 2013, project leaders will cross global and disciplinary boundaries to create this dialogue. Please share this opportunity with any on your campus or beyond who might be interested.

This academic year (2012-2013), an international network of scholars and artists activated by Alexandra Juhasz (Professor Media Studies, Pitzer College) and Anne Balsamo (Dean of the School of Media Studies, at the New School for Public Engagement in New York) are working together to design and develop the course. I believe that this project presents an important opportunity to connect students at liberal arts colleges into a larger learning network, as we prepare them to be citizens in a globally networked world.

Campuses may join the course in a variety of ways:

  • faculty may offer an associated course on their home campus;
  • students can take the course as an independent study with local faculty members mentoring them; or
  • anyone who is interested may join as informal learners.

Currently, network members are building the course by submitting and evaluating “Boundary Objects that Learn”—the course’s basic pedagogic instruments.

To help members of the NITLE network learn more about this project, and the alternative model it presents for how liberal arts colleges might effectively counter the current drive to massive online courses (like MOOCs), NITLE will be offering a free online seminar for NITLE network members on Thursday, October 4, 4-5 pm EDT. Seminar participants will join project leaders, Alexandra Juhasz and Anne Balsamo to learn about and discuss this project. Find out more about the seminar and register online: http://www.nitle.org/live/events/144-femtechnet-the-first-docc-a-feminist-mooc For those who are not NITLE network members, please contact Juhasz or Balsamo directly or go to the FemBot Collective to find out how to get involved.

I’ve got another post brewing on the implications of this project in terms of MOOCs, academic collaboration between campuses, etc., but wanted to get this opportunity out there now.

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