Tanner Talks: Information and Access: Sharing Knowledge Across Virtual Communities

March 3, 2014 § Leave a comment

Last October, during Open Access Week, I participated in a stimulating panel as part of the “2013–14 Tanner Talks: Information and Access: Sharing Knowledge Across Virtual Communities” at Utah State University on Wednesday, October 23, 2013.  Here is the description:

Peter Binfield (physicist & publisher of PeerJ, an open-access journal), Rebecca Frost Davis (an expert on digital humanities at St. Edward’s University) and Adam Moore (an expert on information ethics at University of Washington) will discuss the terms, the movements, and the philosophical impetus for and potential shortcomings of higher education as it becomes “digital” and “open.” The 2013–14 Tanner Talks, a series of cross-disciplinary events focusing on the theme “Knowledge and Community,” are a presentation of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences.

My role on the panel was to address Digital Humanities and Open Access.  I was asked to prepare answers to these questions in advance:

  • What are the benefits and costs of open access and increasing digitization of academic work?
  • What is the relationship between Digital Humanities and open access?
  • How is the Digital Humanities movement changing scholarship and teaching?

The video for this panel is available online as a video podcast from Utah State University.

For those who watch the video–my notes were on my iPhone.  I wasn’t texting or checking email throughout the panel.

My experience in this panel led me to better articulate for myself what I’ve been discussing in subsequent talks as the change in the knowledge economy from a model of scarcity to one of abundance and the challenges of adjusting to that change, especially as they relate to scholarship and other academic practices.

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How Humanists Read and Why We Need a Better (Electronic) Reading Ecosystem

October 10, 2012 § 4 Comments

I just completed an interesting and brief survey on humanities reading practices from Aditi Muralidharan. If you complete the survey, you can see the aggregate survey results. The survey asks questions about whether you copy out snippets of text that you are reading. I found that my reading practices seem similar to many other humanists in the fact that I do copy out snippets, how long they are, and how I use them.  Behind this survey, I hope I’m seeing the promise of improved tools to suport humanities research practices. « Read the rest of this entry »

My latest at NITLE’s Techne blog: Digital Humanities Now, A Videoconference Discussion

November 11, 2011 § 2 Comments

Originally posted on November 11, 2011 at NITLE’s Techne blog, http://blogs.nitle.org/2011/11/11/digital-humanities-now-a-videoconference-discussion/

DHNow Hangout

Last week Digital Humanities Now (@dhnow) was relaunched.  This experiment in how we evaluate scholarship begs the question, how will our colleagues outside the digital humanities evaluate our digital work?  How can we make our work legible to them? This was the subject of yesterday’s impromptu videoconference discussion.

I was joined by Joan Fragaszy Troyano, Managing Editor and Sasha Boni, Editor, Digital Humanities Now, as well as Ryan Cordell, Assistant Professor of English at St. Norbert College and a member of NITLE’s Digital Humanities CouncilGabriel Hankins, University of Virginia Scholars’ Lab Fellow; and Chris Dickman, Ph.D. candidate in English Composition and Rhetoric at Saint Louis University, and co-organizer of THATCamp Pedagogy. « Read the rest of this entry »

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