Networking Students, Faculty, and Courses to Enhance the Curriculum at Liberal Arts Colleges

June 27, 2014 § 1 Comment

This morning I’m speaking at the 18th Annual NAC&U Summer Institute, “Creating Community Through Collaboration,” at the University of Redlands. My talk focuses on intercampus academic collaboration and is called, “Networking Students, Faculty, and Courses to Enhance the Curriculum at Liberal Arts Colleges.” « Read the rest of this entry »

“Everything Is Cool When You’re Part of a Team”

May 16, 2014 § Leave a comment

I’ll be delivering the keynote today at a mini-symposium on collaboration that proceeds THATCamp DHCollaborate 2014 at Texas A&M University: http://dhcollaborate2014.thatcamp.org/ 

Here’s a description of my talk and a trailer . . . « Read the rest of this entry »

Global Learning through MOOC Translation?

April 29, 2014 § 4 Comments

Coursera Global Translator CommunityThis morning I found an email in my inbox inviting me to become a translator of MOOCs by joining the Coursera-sponsored Global Translator Community.  I find this announcement interesting in its implications for MOOC community, crowdsourcing, applied learning opportunities, and global learning. « Read the rest of this entry »

Apps for the Commuter: Update

April 24, 2014 § Leave a comment

In January I shared how I make the most of my commute by having VoiceOver read books and articles to me: Apps for the Commuter.  I’m attending an Apple Leadership event at Apple headquarters in Cupertino today, and I just found out a better way to use VoiceOver.  I’ve always thought I had to turn it on and have it on for everything.  It turns out there is a shortcut that makes it easier to turn on and off on the fly.  Here are the directions. « Read the rest of this entry »

Digital Pedagogy in the Liberal Arts

February 6, 2014 § Leave a comment

Today, I am delivering a talk at Whittier College called, “Digital Pedagogy in the Liberal Arts: Models, Keywords, and Prototypes”.

Slides are here:

Scroll down for references and links to models:

« Read the rest of this entry »

Slides for Using Disruption to Stay on Course (for Liberal Education)

January 22, 2014 § Leave a comment

Using Disruption to Stay on Course (for Liberal Education)

January 22, 2014 § Leave a comment

AACU-logo_largeThis afternoon I’m teaching a workshop called “Using Disruption to Stay on Course (for Liberal Education)” at the annual meeting of the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U). I’ve posted materials for this workshop to my blog, linked from the page called Using Disruption.  My basic premise for the workshop is that, although technological changes are disrupting higher education, colleges and universities can find ways to adapt these disruptions to the service of liberal education.  In the workshop I’ll share some models of colleges who have done just that, ask the participants to reflect on disruption at their own campus, set up breakout discussions of individual disruptions in the context of liberal education, and then we’ll work as a group to develop some recommendations.  « Read the rest of this entry »

Apps for the Commuter

January 14, 2014 § Leave a comment

Last week, Profhacker’s Open Thread Wednesday asked about our favorite mobile apps.  The text of my response is below, with the addition of links:

I have to give a shout out not to an app but to some built in functionality in iPads and iPhones. My commute can be up to an hour, and since public transportation is not an option that means all driving and no reading.

I find VoiceOver–one of the accessibility features on the iPad and iPhone–to be invaluable. Here’s how I include it in my workflow. During breakfast, I read RSS feeds using Mr. Reader on my iPad. (I love this app because I can send articles to Instapaper, Diigo, twitter, etc.). I send the articles I want to read later to Instapaper and make sure they download before I leave the house. (I only have wireless on my iPad, so no downloads on the road.) In the garage, I open Instapaper and ask Siri to turn on VoiceOver. Then I start my iPad reading and listen to the morning’s news while I drive. When I arrive on campus, Siri is once again working on the campus wireless network, so I have her turn off VoiceOver.

Turning on VoiceOver

Turning on VoiceOver

You can also turn VoiceOver on and off using the menu, but when it is on it takes more clicks. You can find the feature under Settings > Accessibility > VoiceOver. You can also set the speed of the voice here.  I find I have to keep mine closer to the tortoise and the hare so I can follow the text while I am driving.  Be aware that touch gestures may be different in this mode.  For example, you must click to select, then double click to open items.  Scrolling is also different.

Alternatively, I have used Voiceover to read books in the kindle app. I found that I could do one chapter of Hirsch’s Digital Humanities Pedagogy per drive, and I could almost hear Lisa Spiro or Tanya Clement talking as their works were read to me. I also used VoiceOver when riding in an airport shuttle when reading made me queasy.

Using my iPad for this reading means that my iPhone is still free for other uses, like checking traffic on the maps app during traffic jams.  I find this type of reading useful for texts I want to familiarize myself with but which I don’t need to go in depth. Since I’ve also saved them to diigo, I can always go back to them when I need to read deeper.  VoiceOver works better on connected prose because if you miss a word, you can usually get the meaning by context.  Finally, I had to slow the pace of the voice down to make sure I caught everything.

MOOCs, Boutique Subjects, and Marginal Approaches

January 10, 2014 § Leave a comment

Today I’m part of panel #s399 at #mla14 on MOOCs, Boutique Subjects, and Marginal Approaches.  This roundtable addresses what happens to marginal approaches (e.g., feminist, queer, disability, racial) and boutique subjects (e.g., medieval studies) in the MOOC paradigm.

My slides are below with references further down:

« Read the rest of this entry »

Digital Humanities and Undergraduate Education

January 9, 2014 § 2 Comments

Today, I’m leading a breakout session at the workshop, Get Started in the Digital Humanities with Help from DHCommons, Thursday, 9 January, 8:30–11:30 a.m., Chicago A-B, Chicago Marriott. The session hashtag is #s3 and the conference hashtag is #mla14.

Digital Humanities and Undergraduate Education

How does digital humanities fit into the undergraduate curriculum?  This workshop will look at digital humanities from an institutional perspective, considering how it advances the learning outcomes of undergraduate education and sharing models of high impact practices from the digital humanities classroom.

Slides and References are below:

« Read the rest of this entry »

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